The Seychelles

Island-hopping was never this exciting because Variety’s voyages to the Seychelles take you straight into those poster-perfect ports of call while allowing you the luxury of exploring them in ways only we can offer. more...

Ports of Call

Sainte Anne Resort & Spa

Sainte Anne Resort & Spa is is only a 10-minute boat ride from the main island of Mahé.
Set among stunning tropical gardens, Sainte Anne is a luxury 'villa-only' resort, where all guests stay all-inclusive. The resort is located in one of Seychelles' largest marine parks and is a magnificent retreat surrounded by three fabulous beaches and clear, glistening sea.

Highlights

  • Take a refreshing swim
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Curieuse

Located north-west of Praslin Island, Curieuse is a bio-reserve marked by its red soil. The island was thus called ‘Red Island’ and was rechristened La Curieuse with the arrival of the French in the 18th century.
It is the only place in the world where the Coco de Mer nut grows naturally. Today, it is a protected species and an ornamental tree. The fruit is used in Ayurvedic medicine and in traditional Chinese medicine. It is also used as flavouring for cooking in China. The other highlight of the island is its giant tortoises, which walk around freely and are a delight to spot. In 1833, the island was used as a leper colony up until 1965. The colony was called Anse St Joseph and the doctor’s residence is a museum and educational centre today.

Highlights

  • Spot giant tortoises
  • Enjoy the beach

Excursions

  • Walking excursion with a park guide to the farms along the mangrove forest
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Cousin Island

At just 25 hectares, this granite island is a conservationists' project that reclaimed the landscape from intensive farming and transformed it into a setting of endemic trees, shrubs and flowers.
Cousin Island is now home to increasing numbers of native Seychellois birds, tortoises and turtles, with some species now recovering from the brink of extinction. Anse Lazio, on the north-west tip of the island, is picture-postcard everywhere you look. Here, the long, broad and pale sand beach has lapis lazuli waters on one side and a thick fringe of palm and takamaka trees on the other, and is framed by a series of granite boulders at each enc. You won't find a better place for sunbathing, and there is some good snorkelling among the rocks along the arms of the bay.

Highlights

  • Water sports, snorkelling

Excursions

  • Optional diving
  • Optional excursion to Bird Sanctuary
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Aride

Blessed with a wealth of natural treasures, Aride Island has remained a wild and beautiful paradise. It was bought as a Nature Reserve in 1973 by internationally renowned conservationist Christopher Cadbury, and is now managed by the Island Conservation Society. Aride is home to 1 million breeding seabirds, endemic birds and turtles and is rich in marine life.


Excursions

  • Optional excursion to the top of the island for an amazing view
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St Pierre Island

One of several islands in the bay of Côte d'Or on Praslin, this tiny islet with its granite profile interspersed with coconut palms has come, over the years, to represent the quintessential Seychelles island, featuring in numerous advertisement campaigns, posters and evocative photographs.
Once home to a number of Coco de Mer trees that grew naturally on the island, St Pierre lies 1.5 km from Pte Zanguilles on Praslin's fabulous Côte d'Or beach. St Pierre is a favourite with swimmers, snorkellers and yachtsmen, for whom the island provides the ideal backdrop for a spectacular Seychelles sunset.

Highlights

  • Snorkelling and swimming
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Praslin

A wicked seductress, Praslin has lots of temptations: stylish lodgings, tangled velvet jungle, curving hills dropping down to clear seas, gorgeous stretches of silky sand edged with palm trees and a slow-motion ambience. Located 45 km north-east of Mahé, the second-largest island in the Seychelles falls somewhere between the relative hustle and bustle of Mahé and the sleepiness of La Digue.
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Felicite Island

Felicite Island is situated 4 km away from La Digue. This Island is in close proximity to other La Digue satellites like Marianne, the Sister Islands, and Ile Cocos. Felicite has gorgeous beaches at La Digue, and offers excellent swimming and snorkelling facilities.


Highlights

  • Swimming, snorkelling

Excursions

  • Optional diving
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La Digue

Just like St Pierre Island, La Digue too is a tropical paradise that appears in countless adverts and glossy travel brochures. It boasts jade waters, bewitching bays studded with heart-stopping beaches and green hills cloaked with tangled jungle.
As if that wasn't enough, La Digue is also a springboard for surrounding islands, including Félicité, Grande Sœur and the fairytale Île Cocos. Despite its lush beauty, La Digue has managed to escape the somewhat rampant tourist development that affects Mahé and Praslin. Sure, it's not undiscovered, but La Digue has a more laidback feel than the other main islands, with only a few surfaced roads and virtually no cars, just the odd ox cart. The place is more a back-to-nature than a jet-set-tourist haven, making it possible to find that deserted anse (bay) where you really feel like you've been stranded in paradise.

Excursions

  • All day excursion in La Digue
  • Optional morning ox-cart tour
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Moyenne Island

Moyenne Island is situated in the Sainte Anne Marine National Park, close to the north coast of Mahe and is less than 1 sq km in size. A privately owned island, it is a wildlife park with accessible paths passing through lush vegetation.
More than 100 giant tortoises roam freely while the 2,000-strong bird population, with 500 endemic turtle doves, flourish here. Huge granite boulders and white sandy beaches add to the splendour of the island, happily situated in the heart of the St Anne Marine National Park, which is sheltered by coral reefs teeming with 150 species of fish. Pirate graves, a treasure dig, ancient ruins, a museum and a turtle lagoon add to the attractions. The island was purchased by Brendon Grimshaw, an English newspaper editor, in the 1970s. He is the only permanent inhabitant of the island and is responsible for returning and keeping the island in a natural state.

Highlights

  • Swimming
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